How to get timestamp in Monkey 2 with libc and in C

This morning I got implemented a little code, that can be used to get timestamp based on ANSI C code using Monkey 2 programming language’s libc.

Let’s take first look at the Monkey 2 code:

At the moment the output of the program is as follows: 40-31-8-26-10-2018

Year 2018, month 10, day 26, hour 8, min 31, sec 40.

Reversed order might be more useful in practice…

Let’s take a look at the C version:

To the year is again added 1900. This gives following output: 26.10.2018

The tm_mon is between 0..11, tm_year between 1900 + 0..n.

That’s it for now, lots of things to do…

 

 

On Signing a Windows App

First I would like to tell you, that I have purchased an OV code signing certificate for one year. I found out from a blog, that K Software has at the moment the cheapest OV code signing certificate, $84 for one year.

As MicroSoft says in their documents, you must have a certificate, if you want to distribute or sell Windows apps.

There are three main categories of certificates on Windows platform: Open Source code signing, OV code signing and EV code signing.

The first is the cheapest — in the best case free — the last is the most expensive.

Open source code signing suits you if you do open source projects. You can check the definition of open source development here.

In the other cases the other two mentioned certificates are for you.

The OV certificate doesn’t prevent at first the smart screen to appear. In time, when you get enough downloads the smart screen won’t appear anymore. The EV certificate that is the most expensive, gives you immediate trust and no more smart screen to your apps.

The main benefit of OV certificate is, that none of the AV software programs considers your precious application a harmful file.

Once you have the certificate, signing the exe is as easy as follows:

The signtool.exe can be found at c:\program files (x86)\Windows Kits\… The appropriate path should be added to your system’s %path% environment variable. If you don’t have …\Windows Kits\ search the internet for Windows SDK version 8.1 or 10.

I have today signed most of my Windows apps. Smart screen will at first still warn you, but the file is no more considered a harmful file.

Unlimited Objects Source Code

In my old blog post I gave some idea how to implement “unlimited objects” program. In the original video I used 16 canvases with 16 images + the actual visible canvas. Two canvases only is sufficient.

In the source (Cerberus X) below, no external graphics files are needed:

The program gives different output, if the calculations are in OnUpdate() on HTML5 target.

Below is the old video I’ve made previously:

Source code license: MIT.

3D Stars As Lines

I must have been really tired when I coded & posted the old 3D stars codes… Anyway, here’s code for 3D stars as lines.

Below the video:

To get the stars drawn as lines is really simple. In the 2D world to draw a line we need x1, y1, x2 and y2. In the projection from 3D space, we simple add for example 4 to the z-coordinate of a point so that, the other point is further away and we get two points to the 2D world.

Below is the main part of the Monkey X source code:

For the end the source code in full:

Feel free to use this code.

 

Sine Wave Scroller in Monkey2

Today’s little code, sine scroller in Monkey2. In the previous post you can download the code and data files for plain scroller. In this project same data files are used. Let’s take a look at the video:

The scrolling isn’t very smooth in the video, but try the code:

The idea is to build a string (“scrollString”) which characters are drawn one by one to the screen in order to achieve the sine wave effect.

Feel free to use this code.

Simple text scrollers in Monkey X and Monkey2

I coded today simple text scrollers in Monkey X and Monkey2. When the old school bug had bitten me I coded among other things the following:

This night it’s time to just simple text scrollers code.

Let’s take a look at the result of the Monkey X code:

The source code:

For the font I’ve used my Font 2 PNG and its data file. Notice, that the update rate is only 15, change that to 60.

 

For the first time I made a text scroller in Monkey2 too. The result is in video below:

As you can see, the code is a little different:

In order the get coding going, you may download both the projects with all the data files. Password to download: scroller

Later it’s time to again for sine wave scrollers… 🙂

Have fun!

Tile Scrolling with Maps Made with my Map Editor

Little tutorial on scrolling a map/world made with my Map Editor.

First, the source code in full:

Quite straight forward, but some words about the code.

In the Map Editor dat-file, the first 4 byte integer declares the width of the map, the second the height of the map in tiles. The size of the map is read first, then the map itself.

The scrolling is made with touch screen in mind.

The meaning of the Abs(…)-sentence is, that in which direction in the touch screen the finger is being moved most and then the map is scrolled into that direction.

The 256 color shapes of the world are from an Ultima IV remake and are free to be used. The original project is “xu4”, if my memory servers me right.

The source above is places to public domain as license for it.

Please, if you make a game (in any programming language) utilizing my code, show me, what you have achieved. I’m big fan of games of this kind of genre.

 

For the end a video regarding this post. At the beginning of the video there’s some scrolling:

 

 

Embedding HTML5 output of Cerberus X to WordPress pages

The first thing you need is Code Embed plugin.

If your HTML5 output code loads files, something must be changed in the JavaScript-code. Find the following piece of code:

The URL of the data drawer must be changed. If you have the data drawer at the root of your www (public_html) drawer, change the “path.slice” line like this:

If you’re working offline with some server program and have a testsite to experiment with, the path can be found as follows:

The y-coordinate of the mouse need also some adjustment, if the page has scrollbar: The y-start depends on the position of the scrollbar.

Find the following function:

The y-coordinate is correct with following change:

With the touch screen no additional changes need to be done.

While working with WordPress, the “tool/status” bar of WordPress changes the y-coordinate too, but the visitor on your page doesn’t have that page with the “tool/status” bar of WordPress. 🙂

You’ll probably want to remove the console from the page, too. Just remove all the references to splitter and console from the CerberusGame.html.

I almost forgot, in CerberusGame.html use absolute path to find the JavaScript-file. For example src=”https://yoursite.com/drawer/program.js”. Perhaps at first is good practice to try with all the contents of the default CerberusGame.html, so that you see that everything is working.

This should help.

As an example in practice, you might want check my online games corner.

Good luck!

Old School XII – Unlimited Objects

The idea to Old School XII comes from Amiga demos from the early 90’s. First there was lots of competition in the Amiga demo scene on who makes a demo with most amount of bobs (blitter objects) in one 50Hz frame. Eventually we saw bob demos with unlimited amount of bobs!

The amount of bobs is basically unlimited; only the visible area of the screen limits the amount of moving bobs. This is achieved with actually only one bob!

I made today this effect in Monkey X.

The implementation in Monkey X is done by using multiple canvases with images. One canvas is used to draw into screen, the rest of of the canvases are used to achieve the unlimited objects effect.

Below is the video of the Monkey X implementation:

I haven’t yet tested if less amount of canvases is sufficient, but in the beginning of the code I wrote the following:

The only object is drawn subsequently to each of created canvases. The following line does the magic of unlimited objects:
For the end below is one Amiga demo with unlimited bobs:

I made HD (or HQ) version of the video later today:

That’s all for now!

Touching an Image in Cerberus X

This post is the 3rd in the series of touching an image pixel accurately. The second one is too complicated, now I have kept it clear and simple.

The image to be touch is middle handled (this makes scaling easier) and the image both moves and is scaled real time.

Here’s the source code:

The actual test is made for the original image data, that is left intact. Because the image is middle handled in order to get the top left corner of the image, one must decrease half of the width and height of the image from the x, y of the image. But as the image is scaled the actual graphical top left corner is x – (width / 2) * scale and y – (height / 2) * scale.

When then top left corner of the rectangle is calculated, to this is added the scaled size: width * scale and height * scale. This is taken care of in the if-sentence, when checking if in the rectangle is touched.

When one has the touching point, the point in the image must be “scaled” by the scale factor, see the commented part of the code for this.

In the actual test is tested is the picture’s alpha value in the calculated point <> 0; if it is, the image that has transparent pixels, must have been touched.

Clear and simple. 🙂

Below is a video of regarding this post:

If you want to compile this in Monkey X, just change in the LoadImageData-part “cerberus” to “monkey”.

Update:

In my Memorable Melodies  game is used slightly different code to touch the images, because the images to be touched don’t have “holes”.